RANGE RESOURCES CORP (RRC)

2015 Climate Risk Disclosure Analysis

Industry Group: Oil & Gas

Standard Industrial Classification: Crude Petroleum & Natural Gas

Index Membership: S&P 500, Russell 3000

Financial Year End: Dec 2014

AND PROPERTIES General Range Resources Corporation, a Delaware corporation, is a Fort Worth, Texas-based independent natural gas, natural gas liquids ('NGLs') and oil company, engaged in the exploration, development and acquisition of natural gas and oil properties, mostly in the Appalachian and Midcontinent regions of the United States. Our corporate offices are located at 100 Throckmorton Street, Suite 1200, Fort Worth, Texas 76102 (telephone (817) 870-2601). Our common stock is listed and traded on the New York Stock Exchange (the 'NYSE') under the symbol 'RRC. At December 31, 2014, we had 168.7 million shares outstanding. Our 2014 production from operations consisted of the following:.. 10-K Filing (2015-02-24)

Disclosure Breakdown

Disclosure Rank

91st percentile in Russell 3000

Disclosure Abstract

5 Relevance:
2%
Government regulations, particularly in the areas of taxation, energy, climate change and the environment, can have a significant impact on operations and profitability.
17 Relevance:
55%
The Clean Air Act, as amended, and comparable state laws restrict the emission of air pollutants from many sources, including compressor stations. These laws and any implementing regulations may require us to obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce air emissions, impose stringent air permit requirements, or use specific equipment or technologies to control emissions. We may be required to incur certain capital expenditures in the next few years for air pollution control equipment in connection with maintaining or obtaining operating permits and approvals for emissions of pollutants. For example, on January 14, 2015, the Obama Administration announced that the EPA is expected to propose in the summer of 2015 and finalize in 2016 new regulations that will set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities as part of the Administration's efforts to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. In a second example, in December 2014, the EPA published a proposed rulemaking that it expects to finalize by October 1, 2015, which rulemaking proposes to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone between 65 to 70 parts per billion for both the 8-hour primary and secondary standards. Compliance with one or both of these regulatory initiative could directly impact us by requiring installation of new emission controls on some of our equipment, resulting in longer permitting timelines, and significantly increasing our capital expenditures and operating costs, which could adversely impact our business.
In 2009, the EPA published its findings that emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases ('GHGs') present a danger to public health and the environment because emissions of such gases are, according to the EPA, contributing to warming of the Earth's atmosphere and other climatic conditions. Based on these findings, the EPA adopted regulations under the existing Clean Air Act establishing Title V and Prevention of Significant Deterioration ('PSD') permitting reviews for GHG emissions from certain large stationary sources that already are potential major sources of certain principal, or criteria, pollutant emissions. We could become subject to these Title V and PSD permitting reviews and be required to install 'best available control technology' to limit emissions of GHGs from any new or significantly modified facilities that we may seek to construct in the future if such facilities emitted volumes of GHGs in excess of threshold permitting levels. The EPA has also adopted rules requiring the reporting of GHG emissions from specified emission sources in the United States on an annual basis, including certain oil and natural gas production facilities, which include several of our facilities. We are monitoring several of our operations for GHG emissions and believe that our monitoring activities are in substantial compliance with applicable reporting obligations.
While Congress has from time to time considered legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs, there has not been significant activity in the form of adopted legislation to reduce GHG emissions at the federal level in recent years. In the absence of federal climate legislation in the U.S., a number of state and regional efforts have emerged that are aimed at tracking and/or reducing GHG emissions by means of cap and trade programs that typically require major sources of GHG emissions, such as electric power plants, to acquire and surrender emission allowances in return for emitting those GHGs.
Although it is not possible at this time to predict how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted to address GHG emissions would impact our business, any such future laws and regulations could require us to incur increased operating costs, such as costs to purchase and operate emissions control systems, to acquire emission allowances or comply with new regulatory or reporting requirements. For example, pursuant to President Obama's Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions, the Obama Administration announced on January 14, 2015 that the EPA is expected to propose in the summer of 2015, and finalize in 2016, new regulations that will set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities as part of the Administration's efforts to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. Any such legislation or regulatory programs could also increase the cost of consuming, and thereby reduce demand for oil and natural gas, which could reduce the demand for the oil and natural gas that we produce. Finally, it should be noted that some scientists have concluded that increasing concentrations of GHGs in the Earth's atmosphere may produce climate changes that have significant physical effects, such as increased frequency and severity of storms, droughts and floods and other climatic events. If any such effects were to occur, they could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
Hydraulic fracturing, which has been used by the industry for over 60 years, is an important and common practice used to stimulate production of natural gas and/or oil from dense subsurface rock formations. The hydraulic fracturing process involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals under pressure into targeted subsurface formations to fracture the surrounding rock and stimulate production. We routinely apply hydraulic fracturing techniques as part of our operations. This process is typically regulated by state oil and natural gas commissions; however, several federal agencies have asserted regulatory authority over certain aspects of the process. For example, the EPA has issued final Clean Air Act regulations governing performance standards, including standards for the capture of air emissions released during hydraulic fracturing; announced its intent to propose in early 2015 effluent limit guidelines that wastewater from shale gas extraction operations must meet before discharging to a treatment plant; and issued in May 2014 a prepublication of its Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Toxic Substances Control Act reporting of the chemical substances and mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing.
item 1a. Risk Factors
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Furthermore, our drilling and producing operations may be curtailed, delayed, or canceled as a result of a variety of factors, including:
 * increases in the costs, shortages or delivery delays of drilling rigs, equipment, water for hydraulic fracturing services, labor, or other services;
 * unexpected operational events and drilling conditions;
 * reductions in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices;
 * limitations in the market for natural gas, NGLs and oil;
 * adverse weather conditions;
 * facility or equipment malfunctions;
 * equipment failures or accidents;
 * title problems;
 * pipe or cement failures;
 * compliance with, or changes in, environmental, tax and other governmental requirements;
 * environmental hazards, such as natural gas leaks, oil spills, pipeline and tank ruptures, and unauthorized discharges of toxic gases;
 * lost or damaged oilfield drilling and service tools;
 * unusual or unexpected geological formations;
 * loss of drilling fluid circulation;
 * pressure or irregularities in formations;
 * fires;
 * natural disasters;
 * surface craterings and explosions; and uncontrollable flows of oil, natural gas or well fluids.
26 Relevance:
41%
The subject of climate change is receiving increasing attention from scientists, legislators, governmental agencies and the general public. There is an ongoing debate as to the extent to which our climate is changing, the potential causes of this change and its potential impacts. Some attribute global warming to increased levels of GHGs, including carbon dioxide and methane, which has led to significant legislative and regulatory efforts to limit GHG emissions.
While Congress has from time to time considered legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs, there has not been significant activity in the form of adopted legislation to reduce GHG emissions at the federal level in recent years. However, there have been a number of regulatory initiatives to address GHG emissions, which include the establishing of Title V and PSD permitting reviews for GHG emissions from certain large stationary sources that are already major potential sources of certain principal, or criteria, pollutant emissions, and the implementation of a GHG monitoring and reporting program for certain sectors of the natural gas and oil industry,
 * including onshore and production, which includes certain of our operations. A number of state and regional efforts have emerged that are aimed at tracking and/or reducing GHG emissions by means of cap and trade programs, in which major sources of GHG emissions acquire and surrender emission allowances in return for emitting those GHGs. The outcome of federal and state actions to address global climate change could result in a variety of regulatory programs including potential new regulations to control or restrict emissions, taxes or other charges to deter emissions of GHGs, energy efficiency requirements to reduce demand, or other regulatory actions. For example, pursuant to President Obama's Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions, the Obama Administration announced on January 14, 2015, that EPA is expected to propose in the summer of 2015 and finalize in 2016 new regulations that will set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities as part of the Administration's efforts to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. These actions could:
 * result in increased costs associated with our operations;
 * increase other costs to our business;
 * affect the demand for natural gas; and impact the prices we charge our customers.
Adoption of federal or state requirements mandating a reduction in GHG emissions could have far-reaching and significant impacts on the energy industry and the U.S. economy. We cannot predict the potential impact of such laws or regulations on our future consolidated financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. For more information regarding the environmental regulation of our business, see 'Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties - Environment and Occupational Health and Safety Matters.
Our business is subject to operating hazards that could result in substantial losses or liabilities that may not be fully covered under our insurance policies Natural gas, NGLs and oil operations are subject to many risks, including well blowouts, craterings, explosions, uncontrollable flows of oil, natural gas or well fluids, fires, pipe or cement failures, pipeline ruptures or spills, vandalism, pollution, releases of toxic gases, adverse weather conditions or natural disasters, and other environmental hazards and risks.
32 Relevance:
2%
Conservation measures and technological advances could reduce demand for oil and natural gas Fuel conservation measures, alternative fuel requirements, governmental requirements for renewable energy resources, increasing consumer demand for alternatives to oil and natural gas, technological advances in fuel economy and energy generation devices could reduce demand for oil and natural gas.
item 9b. Other Information
60 Relevance:
2%
Helms serves as a director of MPLX GP LLC, a publicly traded midstream crude oil and refined products pipeline; Questar Corporation, an integrated natural gas company that develops, produces and delivers natural gas and Coskata, Inc, a renewable energy company.

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